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Heteropoda cervina (Brown Huntsman)

Female with brood cocoon

The Brown Huntsman is a mottled brown, fast running ground dwelling spider often found in leaf litter. They shelter under bark during the day. They have a flattened body, eight eyes set in two rows of four. All huntsman are nocturnal. At the start of the evening the spiders leave their hiding places and wander around searching for prey which they kill with a bite from strong, curved fangs. Males and females look alike, males smaller. Heteropodidae refers to differently (unequally) sized legs.

Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

Another female with brood cocoon


Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

Female (closeup)


Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

Female closeup from above


Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on leaf litter

Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on black plastic


Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on leaf litter


Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on terracotta


Heteropoda cervina male
Photo: Robert Whyte

Face on, on terracotta


Heteropoda cervina male
Photo: Robert Whyte

Eye pattern


Heteropoda cervina male
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on terracotta


Heteropoda cervina male
Photo: Robert Whyte

From above on terracotta


Heteropoda cervina male
Photo: Robert Whyte

Another specimen, large female, body length 40mm


Heteropoda cervina
Photo: Robert Whyte

Large female from above


Heteropoda cervina
Photo: Robert Whyte

Large female face on


Heteropoda cervina
Photo: Robert Whyte

Juvenile Huntsman sp. eating another spider

Huntsman Spider Sparassidae
Photo: Robert Whyte

Heteropoda spiderling facing


Small spider, about 3.5mm body length, flushed to the surface of some cork mulch when watering a pot plant. David Hirst, SA Museum writes: "It certainly does have the appearance of a huntsman and I think a juvenile (spiderling) of Heteropoda. Some spiderlings look quite different once they have reached maturity with some some colours & patterns developing with each moult."

Thomisid sp?
Photo: Robert Whyte

 

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